The first quantum revolution of the 1950's led to many technologies that have become ubiquitous in society in the 21st century, including consumer electronics, computing, sensing, medical imaging, and the Global Positioning System. Physics at The University of Queensland is an international leader of the second quantum revolution, based on the understanding, control, and engineering of quantum many-body systems. The recent Excellence in Research Australia assessment gave quantum physics at UQ the maximum rating of "well above world standard." UQ has a number of ARC research fellows, and many well-funded research groups in theoretical and experimental quantum science. We are the lead institution for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, and host a node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.

Quantum Science

Available Projects

Exisiting at temperatures near absolute zero,...

Dr Tyler Neely

Our planned production of spinor condensates will require careful control of external magnetic fields. In an effort to do this, we will be...

Dr Tyler Neely

This project will centre on implementing and characterising the darkground imaging...

Dr Tyler Neely

Our lab has recently demonstrated the ability to control the density of an 87Rb BEC on a...

Dr Tyler Neely

PhD, Masters, Honours, and Summer projects are available in the area of fundamental tests of quantum mechanics in macroscopic regimes. The project addresses an open fundamental question in physics of how quantum mechanics applies to systems...

Associate Professor Karen Kheruntsyan

The project aims to develop a new theoretical approach - stochastic quantum hydrodynamics - to understand one of the grand challenges of physics: how do complex, many-particle systems evolve in the quantum realm when driven far from equilibrium? Understanding the out-of-equilibrium of such...

Associate Professor Karen Kheruntsyan

Superradiance occurs when several emitters emit radiation in phase, causing the emission to occur much faster than it would if each emitter was independent. This project is about simulating...

Dr Ivan Kassal

High temperature superconductivity is one of the great unsolved problems in physics. In order to understand it we must solve the Schrodinger equation for ~1023 electrons that are interacting strongly with one...

Professor Ben Powell
Ratios have provided fundamental new insights many phenomena. Ratios that take the same value in almost all situations are particularly useful as when they deviate from their usual value it is a clear signature that something interesting is happening. The...
Professor Ben Powell

Spin liquids are exotic phases of mater where quantum fluctuations suppress classical long-range order. They are of particular interest because they may support deconfined ...

Professor Ben Powell

 

Unlike electronics, devices based around ultra-cold atoms aren’t strongly coupled to the environment through the electromagnetic interaction, so make an ideal test-bed for tests of coherent...

Dr Simon Haine

Photosynthetic organisms harvest light through large antenna complexes containing many chlorophyll molecules. Recent experiments have found that energy may be transported through antenna...

Dr Ivan Kassal

 

The major roadblock for optical quantum information technologies is the absence of reliable single- and entangled- photons sources. The standard technique to generate such states employ the photons...

Dr Marcelo De Almeida

Hybrid quantum technologies seek to alleviate the short commings of two individual quantum architectures by moving the information between the two systems. Commonly one seeks to exploit the excellent readout and storage capabilities of...

Dr Till Weinhold

Quantum communication is already the first commercial application of quantum technology allowing the secure sharing of secrets over a dedicated channel. However the achievable distances are limited due to the inability to build efficient quantum repeaters —systems that teleport the quantum...

Dr Till Weinhold

Photons are one of the strongest candidates to implement scalable quantum computing and simulation architectures [1]. They are ideal for the distribution of quantum information and can be readily manipulated using a wealth of existing telecommunications technologies. However, the primary...

Dr Till Weinhold

A number of Honors and Summer projects are available in the Quantum Device Laboratory, The University of Queensland. The student will have unique...

Dr Arkady Fedorov

A number of Master and PhD studentships are available in the Quantum Device Laboratory, The University of Queensland in the area of superconducting quantum circuits. The laboratory aims at developing the next generation of superconducting nanodevices consisting of superconducting qubits or...

Dr Arkady Fedorov

Over the last 3 years we have been developing a theory to understand the ...

Associate Professor Tom Stace

When building a quantum computer, or other quantum processing device, it is important to be able recover from errors that may arise.  This is accomplished using error correcting codes, which redundantly encode quantum information in...

Associate Professor Tom Stace

 

Many quantum systems interact with their environment, which destroys some of the peculiarities that quantum mechanics is known for, such as entanglement.   One of the common ways to...
Associate Professor Tom Stace

Our two most fundamental theories of the universe are general relativity and quantum mechanics. Both work extremely well in predicting and quantifying phenomena in their respective regimes of application, but at a deep level the two theories are incompatible. Relativistic Quantum Information...

Professor Tim Ralph

Communications based on exchanging quantum particles such as photons can achieve outcomes that are impossible with classical communication systems. For example quantum key distribution (QKD) can achieve unconditionally secure communication. Because of the fragility of quantum particles, special...

Professor Tim Ralph

Quantum Computers promise major speed-ups in computation times for certain problems. Building a large-scale, universal quantum computer is a major practical challenge and still seems a long way off. However, recent results suggest that single-purpose quantum computers are far more practical in...

Professor Tim Ralph

Some recent developments in statistical mechanics have come up with new geometric interpretations of thermodynamic quantities.  This project would look at applying these ideas to the Bose gas.  In particular, it would be to analytically incorporate additional conserved quantities into...

Professor Matthew Davis

Polariton condensates occur in two-dimensional semiconductor microcavities pumped by a laser.  The light excites electrons from the valence band to the conduction band,...

Professor Matthew Davis

In the 1970s there was speculation that the cause of superfluidity in helium-4 was not due to Bose-Einstein condensation, but a form of Cooper pairing between attractive bosons,...

Professor Matthew Davis

This project simulates the quantum dynamics of a “spin-1” Bose gas in a double well potential.  A spin-1 gas has three spin components, which can interconvert due to spin-collisions (...

Professor Matthew Davis

 

"And therefore, the problem is, how can we simulate the quantum mechanics?...We can give up on our rule about what the computer was, we can say: Let the computer itself be built of quantum mechanical elements which obey quantum mechanical laws. ...

Dr Tyler Neely

This theoretical project uses fermionic matterwaves to increase the sensitivity of atom interferometers for precision measurement. The focus on...

Dr Joel Corney

This project is aimed at a theoretical and computational exploration of atoms and how they tick.  With recent atomic physics experiments being able to measure towards accuracies of 1 part in 1018, they require high-...

Dr Michael Bromley

This project is aimed at a theoretical and computational exploration of the quantum-atom optics of ultracold matter.  The goal is to design and characterise novel high-...

Dr Michael Bromley

 

Modelling the behavior of correlated electrons in finite systems is at the heart of theoretical chemistry.  Many sophisticated techniques have been...

Dr Seth Olsen

 

This project involves using minimal physical Hamiltonian models to study the flow of energy and information associated with the dynamical breakdown of the Born...

Dr Seth Olsen

Dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) were experimentally observed for the first time in 1995, more than seventy years after their initial proposal by Einstein.  Like helium-4 below the lambda point, they exhibit the defining...

Professor Matthew Davis

The project seeks to understand an open fundamental problem in physics: How do complex microscopic interactions in many-particle systems lead to the emergence of a qualitatively new behavior and to the formation of new states of quantum matter. We will investigate this problem in the context of...

Associate Professor Karen Kheruntsyan

A non-Gaussian system is one for which the outputs do not obey Gaussian statistics. In the continuous-variable regime, this normally means a nonlinearity of higher than second order in the interaction Hamiltonian. Well known systems meeting this criterion are trapped Bose-Einstein condensates...

Dr Murray Olsen

For quantum computing and simulation using neutral atoms trapped in a lattice one needs a physically scalable system that can facilitate single qubit initialization, gate and entanglement operations and state selective read-out.  The...

Dr Mark Baker

Since the first experimental realization of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), many of its properties have been thoroughly investigated. Superfluidity is one of the properties of a...

Dr Mark Baker

The stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii formalism can sample the grand-canonical ensemble for the interacting Bose gas by assuming the ergodic hypothesis that time evolution fairly...

Professor Matthew Davis

One of the identifying features of a superfluid is that it exhibits frictionless flow below a certain critical velocity.  A developing research area is in the study of dipolar ultra-cold...

Professor Matthew Davis

One of the key insights of Landau was to derive a phenomenological formula for the critical velocity in a superfluid.  In a Bose gas this is...

Professor Matthew Davis

Phase transitions are interesting in that they can be divided into a number of universality classes, which are characterized by their critical exponents – how quantities such as correlation lengths and times depend on temperature near the critical point.  The interacting Bose gas is...

Professor Matthew Davis

Taking advantage of the subtleties of quantum mechanics to do useful tasks is one of the keys to future technological advances.  In the Centre for Engineered Quantum systems, we are developing theory and experiment to identify promising systems to that end.  For instance, recent...

Associate Professor Tom Stace

An atom laser is a device that spits out atoms in the same way that an optical laser spits out light: That is, it creates an atomic matterwave with a well defined wavelength, amplitude and phase. Such a system is interesting for...

Dr Simon Haine

An atom interferometer is a device that utilizes the quantum wave-like nature of atoms to make extremely sensitive measurements of quantities such as rotations and accelerations. This...

Dr Simon Haine

How do isolated quantum systems thermalise?  Isolated quantum systems undergo unitary evolution which preserves the entropy.  However, at the level of statistical mechanics, any disturbance will lead to an increase in entropy...

Professor Matthew Davis

Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potentials have been used as a relatively simple system in which to study the quantum many-body physics of ultracold atoms, in particular the interplay of quantum...

Dr Joel Corney

The propagation of ultrashort pulses of light in optical fibre has proved to be a very efficient method of 'squeezing' the quantum properties of light. Squeezing means the...

Dr Joel Corney

A PhD projects are available within the Queensland Quantum Optics Laboratory in the areas of photonics, quantum optics, and quantum opto-mechanics. The lab aims to answer fundamental questions in quantum physics, and develop proof-of-principle applications in sensing and metrology. The key...

Professor Warwick Bowen