Our seminars bring together UQ's applied and computational mathematics communities.

UQ and invited scientists deliver the presentations, which are informal and promote discussion.

We welcome suggestions for speakers and topics from staff, students and visitors, and encourage students to share their work.

Our seminars are held on Thursdays from 3pm to 4pm in the Priestley Building (Building 67), Room 442.

To suggest a topic or speaker, and for more information, contact Dr Dietmar Oelz or Dr Fred Roosta-Khoransani.

Contacts

Dr Dietmar Oelz
Dr Fred Roosta-Khoransani

Chaotic Sensing: Using Fractals and Turbulence to Accelerate Imaging

4 October 2018 3:00pm4:00pm
Shekhar “Shakes” Chandra, Ph.D (School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, UQ)

Analysis, Simulation, and Optimization of Stochastic Vesicle Dynamics in Synaptic Transmission

16 August 2018 3:00pm4:00pm
Calvin Zhang, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Assistant Professor of Neuroscience, University of Arizona

Discrete and continuum modelling of biological network formation. Speaker: Jan Haskovec (KAUST: King Abdullah University of Science an Technology)

17 July 2018 10:30am11:30am
Motivated by recent papers describing rules for natural network formation in discrete settings, we propose an elliptic-parabolic system of partial differential equations. The model describes the pressure field due to Darcy’s type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects with a diffusion rate representing randomness in the material structure. After a short overview of the principles of discrete network modelling, we show how to derive the corresponding macroscopic (continuum) description. The highly unusual structure of the resulting PDE system induces several interesting challenges for its mathematical analysis. We give a short overview of the tools and tricks that can be used to overcome them. In particular, we present results regarding the existence of weak solutions of the system, based on recent results on elliptic regularity theory. Moreover, we study the structure and stability properties of steady states that play a central role to understand the pattern capacity of the system. We present results of systematic numerical simulations of the system that provide further insights into the properties of the network-type solutions.

An entropy-based measure for comparing distributions

11 June 2018 11:00am12:00pm
Rajeev Rajaram (Kent State University, Ohio)

Modelling, predicting and understanding kidney development using microscopy imaging

22 March 2018 2:00pm3:00pm
Dr Nicholas Hamilton (Institute for Molecular Biosciences, UQ)